Lindsay Buziak – innocence from celebration to desecration

Lindsay Buziak between Jason Zailo and Greg Martel

Lindsay Buziak pictured between Jason Zailo (on left, knife in hand) and Greg Martel (on right, smiling)

Lindsay Buziak pictured above, celebrates her last birthday, with boyfriend Jason Zailo, and friend, Zailo’s Dominion Lending boss, Greg Martel.

Three months after this November 2007 celebration of Lindsay’s 24th birthday, the following obituary appears:

BUZIAK, Lindsay Elizabeth Born in Victoria, November 2, 1983. It is with broken hearts we announce that our precious, beautiful, vivacious, talented, fun-loving and successful ray of sunshine was horrifically taken from us and placed into the arms of God. Lindsay is survived by her mother, Evelyn Reitmayer; her father, Jeff Buziak; her sister, Sara Buziak; her maternal grandparents, Dorothy and Albert Reitmayer; her boyfriend, Jason Zailo; and his family. Lindsay is further survived by her Aunts, Uncles, cousins, and countless friends. Lindsay’s zest for life was contagious and the many dear friends she met along her journey were a testament to her generous and caring spirit. She exuded warmth, had a keen sense of fashion, an infectious laugh and a smile that lit up a room. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 9, 2008, at 1:00 p.m. at St. Andrews Cathedral, 740 View Street, Victoria, British Columbia. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Lindsay may be directed to the Alzheimer Society of British Columbia or the Canadian Cancer Society. We wish to thank everyone for their kind words, support and comforting actions. The outpouring of love is overwhelming. We also wish to thank and acknowledge the Saanich Police for all of their hard work and efforts in bringing to justice those responsible for this heinous crime. We ask that individuals with any information that will aid in the investigation to please contact police.

Posted in BC, British Columbia, Camosun, Canada, crime, Dominion Lending, facebook, God, Greg Martel, Jason Zailo, Jeff Buziak, Lindsay Buziak, murder, murders, police, realtor, ReMax, Saanich, Saanich Police Department, Uncategorized, Vancouver Island, Victoria, Westshore | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Detection Deception: Sniffing Out Liars – Part I

In the lovely, usually peaceful, community of Saanich, British Columbia, Canada, investigation into the savage murder of 24-year-old ReMax Camosun realtor Lindsay Buziak has been botched.*

Since February 2, 2008, the day Cohen Oatman and Jason Zailo, two friends and mortgage brokers, reported finding Buziak’s mutilated body in a vacant house in Saanich questions have been raised about handling of the case.

In charge of the official police investigation is Saanich Police Detective Sergeant Craig Sampson. As well as working with the SPD, Sampson works with a private outfit called ITV Consulting Inc., based in Victoria, BC (which neighbours Saanich).

Here’s Sampson pictured on the ITV Consulting Staff page:

 CRAIG R. SAMPSON

  • Detective Sergeant, Saanich Police Major Crime
  • 27 years police service, 6 years major crimes
  • 3 years Child Abuse Team
  • Experience in all aspects of police investigation
  • Certified examiner since 2004; advanced examiner since 2006
  • Experienced examiner in both criminal matters and pre-employment screening 
  • Instructor in interviewing, interrogation and pre-employment screening
  • Home · About ITV · The CVSA Product · Training · Services · Contact Us · Resources
  •  

    Recently, The Times Colonist newspaper, also based in Victoria, published a profile of ITV Consulting Inc. that the company likes so much it’s posted, not once, but, twice, on more than one web-page of the ITV website first as: “DECEPTION DETECTION: VICTORIA INTERROGATORS SNIFF OUT LIARS – from the Victoria Times Colonist and Vancouver Sun Province” and, then, again as “MASTERS OF POLICE INTERROGATION – from the Victoria Times Colonist”.

    Via syndication, from the Times Colonist (the original source), the same profile ran in multiple newspapers across Canada – The Montreal Gazette, The National Post, Nanaimo Daily News, Saskatoon Star Phoenix, Regina Leader Post and others. That’s extremely valuable promotion for ITV’s products and services.

    The article also provides comfort to those who worry that something may be amiss. As the papers explain, the Saanich “Interrogation team helps other officers pick up clues” – and not just in their local community. These “B.C. experts teach deception-detection techniques to U.S. officials” according to the writer, Katie De Rosa, who interviewed two of Craig Sampson’s colleagues, Don Wiebe and Robert Wall.

    In discussing ITV Consulting‘s work, the article cites two specific examples, and details these, providing a photo of the sociopathic killer caught using ITV’s “Kinesic” method  in the first case:

    The widely-viewed interrogation by Ontario Provincial Police Det. Sgt. Jim Smyth, right, who successfully extracted a confession from convicted sex killer Russell Williams, left, is an example of the technique taught by Wiebe.

    “The widely-viewed interrogation by Ontario Provincial Police Det. Sgt. Jim Smyth, who successfully extracted a confession from convicted sex killer Russell Williams, is an example of the technique taught by Wiebe.

    Smyth was calm, well-prepared and armed with damning evidence — such as footprints found near the home of victim Jessica Lloyd that matched Williams’ boots.

    Wiebe and Wall both served 30 years with the Saanich police, both spending about a third of their career in major crime.

    Wiebe started teaching the interrogation techniques in 2002, mentored by former Atlanta cop D. Glenn Foster, one of the foremost experts on police interrogation.

    The pair were among seven of Saanich’s most senior cops who retired on Feb. 1, 2008.

    As they travel the U.S. teaching, they are often asked by homicide investigators to take a look at a video tape or an interrogation and give their opinion on whether a suspect is lying.

    Last year, the two watched a taped interview with Munawar Toha, whose wife, Surya, had gone missing in March 2010 in Coral Springs, Fla. They noticed that despite Toha’s profound expressions of grief at his wife’s disappearance, there were no tears.

    The two also pointed to a phrase used by Toha: ‘To tell the truth, I don’t have a clue where she is,’ he said. The phrase, ‘to tell the truth’ is often something liars say when trying too hard to sell their story, Wiebe said.

    Toha was eventually charged with his wife’s murder.

    Instead of a lie detector to assist with interrogations, Wiebe uses something called a Computer Voice Stress Analyzer (CVSA). A microphone records the person’s answers and the computer measures small frequency modulations in their voice.

    Saanich police adopted this technology after Wiebe took the training in 2002.”

    That’s all reassuring word on the ITV Consulting team appearing in print media and online in February 2011.

    Their deception detection techniques are catching killers in Canada and the USA.

    To be continued…

    * Discussion of the Lindsay Buziak murder investigation is on facebook @
    Botched Investigation: Saanich Police dazed and confused” one of numerous threads in the forum Find Lindsay Buziak’s Murderers created by Jeff Buziak, father of the murder victim, Lindsay Buziak.

    Posted in British Columbia, Canada, Charles Humble, Cohen Oatman, Computerized Voice Stress Analyzer, crime, CVSA, De Sousa, Florida, Jason Zailo, lie detector, Lindsay Buziak, murder, NITV, police, polygraph, realtor, ReMax, Saanich, Saanich Police Department, Uncategorized, Vancouver Island, Victoria, Voice Stress Analysis, Westshore | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

    Police Enlist “Ouiji board” in Pursuit of Justice: Part II

    In wide-ranging cases, including such high-profile examples as Lee Anthony Evans who murdered five teenagers in New Jersey, the “Green River Killer” Gary Leon Ridgeway (who, after slaying several women, was cleared by a polygraph and went on to take the lives of dozens more victims), alleged “Anthrax Killer” Bruce Ivins, former-Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling and many more, polygraphs have proven unreliable. Guilty parties can pass the test and be cleared of suspicion and innocent parties found deceptive.

    A review of polygraph research studies conducted in 2003 by the National Academy of Sciences found there is “no direct scientific evidence assessing the value of the polygraph as a deterrent, as a way to elicit admissions and confessions, or as a means of supporting public confidence.” In 2005 the British Psychological Society warned against using polygraphs as a means of detection after finding that examiners classified up to 47% of innocent people as guilty and up to 17% of guilty parties as innocent.

    Just last month, in Canada, Charles Momy, President of the 57,000-member Canadian Police Association, questioned the recent decision of Quebec City’s municipal police to use the polygraph as a pre-employment screening device. “You could be eliminating very good candidates because the polygraph is not foolproof,” says Momy, who stresses that the best recruiting results are achieved by conducting thorough interview and background investigation of applicants. “You can obtain probably a lot more information from recruits that way than going the polygraph route. And I say that even as a former polygraph examiner.”

    Momy’s concerns echo those of many outside and inside the law enforcement community. “The same polygraph that gave (Enron’s) Skilling an NDI (No Deception Indicated) is used every day to weed out otherwise qualified law enforcement applicants who have passed their background investigation. In my opinion we in law enforcement are losing large numbers of qualified applicants for no reason whatsoever, and it is hurting our profession.”

    “CVSA and polygraphs can both be used effectively to solicit confessions during an interrogation if the subject believes that any lie they tell will be detected. If the subject believes that a deck of Tarot cards in the hands of a Gypsy fortune-teller will be able to tell if any lies are told, the Tarot cards will be equally effective at soliciting a confession,” adds the concerned officer.

    In Saanich, BC, Canada where the local police force is charged with investigating the brutal 2008 murder of realtor Lindsay Buziak they do not have a polygraph machine to use on recruits. Instead, they rely upon a device known as the “Computer Voice Stress Analyzer”. The CVSA is the center-piece of a serious, and long-running, scam in the modern era of law enforcement and public policy.

    “The main proponent for the VSA industry” is how Charles Humble, Ph.D., associated with something called the National Institute for Truth Verification, describes himself. The NITV is headquartered at Fortune Circle, West Palm Beach, Florida and there are distributorships springing up across North America, routinely staffed by retired police officers who profit from selling the pseudo-scientific CVSA units and giving training sessions in their usage.

    ABC’s primetime caught up with “Dr.” Humble. Here’s the chief apostle of “truth verification systems” questioned by senior investigative correspondent Brian Ross:


    In this video – it normally takes years to earn a PhD, “the main proponent for the VSA industry”, Dr. Charles Humble, gets his in six hours

    “If you think the CVSA is going to tell you whether witnesses or suspects are telling the truth, you’re gravely mistaken,” observes Richard Leo, Ph.D, J.D. , one of the world’s leading authorities on interrogation. A renowned criminologist and Associate Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco, Leo says if a law enforcement agency buys a CVSA, “You’re wasting your money and you’re wasting public money. You might as well be flipping coins or reading tea leaves or reading an Ouija board.”

    The evidentiary support for Leo’s position is overwhelming.

    To be continued…

    Posted in Brian Ross, British Columbia, Canada, Charles Humble, Charles Momy, Computerized Voice Stress Analyzer, crime, CVSA, Florida, lie detector, Lindsay Buziak, murder, NITV, police, polygraph, primetime, realtor, Richard Leo, Saanich, Saanich Police Department, Uncategorized, Vancouver Island, Victoria, Voice Stress Analysis | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment